Dear visitors! For technical reasons, meeting with the organizers of the «Weeks of Conscience» postponed to  indefinite period. We apologize.

Little Photographs

William Carrick.
Russian Types. Saint-Petersburg. 1860s.
Gelatin silver print.
Private collection Unknown photographer.
Summer in the Ancestral Estate of Piotr Durnovo (Russian Interior Minister), Treskino, Saratov Government. 1914.
Gelatin silver print.
Nadezhda Durnovo Archive Unknown photographer.
Automobile-Sledge of Nicholas II in the Hands of Revolutionary Masses. Petrograd. 1917.
Yakov Shteinberg.
First Days of the Revolution. Petrograd. 1917.
Gelatin silver print.
Private collection Arkady Shaikhet.
Meeting at a Collective Farm. 1928.
Foot-Messengers and Wanderers. 1924.
Gelatin silver print.
Private collection Yury Rybchinsky.
Stall. Belgorod Region. 1970s.
‘After a friendly visit’. Pereslavl-Zalessky. 1979.
Gelatin silver print.
Artist’s collection Alexander Rodchenko.
Daughter. Moscow. 1927.
Mother and Daughter. Moscow. 1926.
Mother, Daughter and Wife. Moscow. 1930.
Gelatin silver print.
Private collection Yelizaveta Mikulina.
‘Have a light’.
A Concert for the Convalescent.
Sons Visiting their Father.
The Arriving Wounded are Being Welcomed by a Cup of Tea.
Evacuation Hospital #2386. 1942.
Gelatin silver print.
Private collection Viacheslav Butuzov.
Bathing One’s Daughter in a Communal Flat. Moscow. 1952.
Gelatin silver print.
Private collection

William Carrick. Russian Types. Saint-Petersburg. 1860s. Gelatin silver print. Private collection

Unknown photographer. Summer in the Ancestral Estate of Piotr Durnovo (Russian Interior Minister), Treskino, Saratov Government. 1914. Gelatin silver print. Nadezhda Durnovo Archive

Unknown photographer. Automobile-Sledge of Nicholas II in the Hands of Revolutionary Masses. Petrograd. 1917. Yakov Shteinberg. First Days of the Revolution. Petrograd. 1917. Gelatin silver print. Private collection

Arkady Shaikhet. Meeting at a Collective Farm. 1928. Foot-Messengers and Wanderers. 1924. Gelatin silver print. Private collection

Yury Rybchinsky. Stall. Belgorod Region. 1970s. ‘After a friendly visit’. Pereslavl-Zalessky. 1979. Gelatin silver print. Artist’s collection

Alexander Rodchenko. Daughter. Moscow. 1927. Mother and Daughter. Moscow. 1926. Mother, Daughter and Wife. Moscow. 1930. Gelatin silver print. Private collection

Yelizaveta Mikulina. ‘Have a light’. A Concert for the Convalescent. Sons Visiting their Father. The Arriving Wounded are Being Welcomed by a Cup of Tea. Evacuation Hospital #2386. 1942. Gelatin silver print. Private collection

Viacheslav Butuzov. Bathing One’s Daughter in a Communal Flat. Moscow. 1952. Gelatin silver print. Private collection

Moscow, 1.08.2012—26.08.2012

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Curator: Sergey Burasovsky

Curator: Sergey Burasovsky

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Opening day photos

Vladimir Golubkov, Olga Sviblova, curator of Brassai's retrospective Agnes de Gouvion Saint Cyr and curator of "Little photographs" exhibition Sergey Burasovsky Marina Loshak Photographers Grigoriy Yaroshenko and Georgy Pervov Serge Golovach Irina Mann Kirill Alyavdin and Alexander Shatalov Anton Belov and Sergey Kapkov

For mass-media

The ’Little Photographs’ exhibition presents unique photographic materials by such classics of Russian photography as Alexander Rodchenko, Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky, William Carrick, Georgy Zelma, Arkady Shaikhet and Dmitri Baltermants, by recognised contemporary photographers like Yuri Rybchinsky, Vladimir Filonov, Viktor Akhlomov and Sergey Burasovsky, and also by unknown photographers.

The exhibits include numerous contact prints, test sheets, studio portraits intended as ’mementos’, congratulatory photo cards, sketches of everyday life and experimental versions of photographs the audience will already know from final prints. Especially valuable are images never previously printed and preserved only as test shots — for example, a number of photographs by A. Rodchenko.

In our day-to-day existence we have all used photographs of widely differing sizes. The most appropriate dimensions for exhibitions were from 30×40 cm up to several metres. Prints of 24×30 or 18×24 cm were utilised for publication in newspapers and magazines. The most popular size for family albums was 9×12 cm. Official documents required snapshots of 6×4 or 3×4 cm. Professional photographers made contact prints or test prints measuring from 24×36 mm to 9×12 cm for working with or storing negatives.

There was huge demand for print runs of photo postcards (10×15 cm). Photographers were keen to print photographic miniatures that were then used as gifts to friends or greeting cards.

Developments in technology and computer science have simply eradicated the demand for many small forms of photography: contact and test prints have been replaced by digital files, domestic albums by online galleries on Odnoklassniki, Facebook, etc.

In this exhibition we show the remarkable refinement of the vanishing small photograph, an art object that is no less compelling than large-scale images.

With the support of

Renault

Strategic information partner

Арт Хроника

General information partner

TimeOut от 11.03

Information partners

Первый канал 13.03.12 Коммерсант FM Foto-Video 13.03.12 Winzavod art review 13.03.12 be in Foto.ru 13.03.12 DI Арт-Гид 13.03.12

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